My experience with a miscarriage and D&E surgery — A Lady Goes West

Miscarriage and D&E surgery. Hello, my friends. This is a post that I wish I didn’t have to write. But I want to share with you what I’ve been going through, because it’s something many women have to go through. And I need to mention before we begin that there will be some TMI moments, […]

My experience with a miscarriage and D&E surgery — A Lady Goes West

My Story: Hysterectomy Surgery and Recovery! — Life’s Philosophy: Love Nothing but Everything.

“I am thankful for my struggle because without it, I wouldn’t have stumbled across my strength” This is my second post re my health after “Endometriosis-My Story” that I posted on the 11th March 2020. Yes, it has been a long battle that I finally won. I decided to share my experience with you all, […]

My Story: Hysterectomy Surgery and Recovery! — Life’s Philosophy: Love Nothing but Everything.

How to Make an Informed Decision About Plastic Surgery — fashionandstylepolice

*Collaborative post. There are a number of reasons that people choose to have plastic surgery throughout their lives. This can range from correcting visual problems relating to an accident or injury, removing excess skin after significant weight loss or childbirth, or simply enhancing things about their looks that they are not happy with. Considering surgery […]

How to Make an Informed Decision About Plastic Surgery — fashionandstylepolice

LASEK Laser Eye Surgery Experience – Two Years Later — Little Franglaise

As promised, and after some lovely responses to my last post, here is Part 2 of my Laser Eye Surgery (LASEK) journey! First Week Post-Op The pain came a couple of hours after surgery, once the anaesthetic wore off. And there is no point in denying it, the pain was real. I had been told […]

LASEK Laser Eye Surgery Experience – Two Years Later — Little Franglaise

My PRK Surgery Experience — It’s Fifi

When I was 6, I noticed that I couldn’t see the blackboard in class so well anymore and I had to literally put my eyeballs two inches away the TV to watch a show. My mother didn’t take it too seriously until I started falling into gutters and puddles. The last straw for her was […]

My PRK Surgery Experience — It’s Fifi

Stories: Abigail — CU Facial Aesthetic Surgery

Happy New Year everyone! I finally had some time to write this post about a wonderful patient that I saw last month for her final visit (1 year after surgery). Of course, she gave me permission to show her images and tell her story. Abigail is a lovely young woman who came to see me […]

Stories: Abigail — CU Facial Aesthetic Surgery

7 Commonly Asked Questions About Laser Eye Surgery

Lasik and other forms of laser eye surgery have become so common and effective that many health plans around the country may soon begin paying for them as acceptable forms of eye surgery. And if they don’t, they should. The success rate with lasik eye surgery and laser eye surgery, in general, has made the procedure a household name, and made it also more affordable, so many more people can actually consider the procedure.

But no matter how many people have lasik eye surgery or laser eye surgery, you may still have your reservations. After all, they are slicing into your eyes, two of the most important organs you have, with a white-hot laser. So don’t be afraid to ask any questions that you may have, and do as much research as necessary to make yourself comfortable with the procedure. Hopefully, we can get a jumpstart for you here with this article – and the answers to the 7 most commonly asked questions about laser eye surgery.

#1: What exactly is laser eye surgery? Lasik is one form of laser eye surgery, whose sole job is to make you not dependent on your glasses or contacts anymore. Lasik stands for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

#2: How does lasik work to correct vision? You sure you want to know the answer to this one? Kidding aside, laser eye surgery works because it actually changes the shape of your cornea, or the clear lens of your eye that allows light to enter your eye. Doctors use a microkeratome, a knife, to create a flap in your cornea. This is then folded back and a laser, called an excimer laser, is used to “shave” off the cornea until it’s the proper shape. Of course, there are other types of laser eye surgery out there, some of which you may have already heard about, like intralase surgery.

#3: How do I know if lasik is right for me? There are a lot of considerations to make before you get the laser eye surgery. First, you have to ask yourself whether or not you can afford the procedure, or whether or not your work and health insurance will pick it up.

#4: Are there other medical conditions that could interfere with the surgery? Yes, you should be aware of any medications that you may be taking that can slow down your healing, such as steroids. You should make sure you don’t suffer from a condition that could slow your healing, such as an autoimmune condition.

#5: Are all eyes able to be “shaved”? No, some eyes, especially those with other conditions, such as dry eye, thin corneas, or pupil disorders, do not make good candidates for laser eye surgery. If your prescription is still in flux – if you’ve changed prescriptions in the last year or two – you should probably hold off on the lasik eye surgery as well.

#6: Does laser eye surgery work 100 percent of the time? No, sometimes the results are not permanent. In that case, repeated procedures may be needed down the road. You could also suffer side effects such as dry eyes, contrast sensitivity, or even blindness.

#7: How do I find a doctor? Ask around your friends, family, colleagues, and other doctors. The best laser eye surgery doctors should be experienced, have the latest equipment, be able to explain everything about the procedure to your heart’s content, and offer care down the road.

 

A New Direction In Weight Control – Gastric Bypass Surgery

Surgery may be a weight-loss option for patients who are severely obese and suffer from serious medical complications due to weight. There are two accepted surgical procedures for reducing body weight: gastroplasty and gastric bypass. Although these two procedures use different surgical methods, they both reduce the stomach to a pouch that is smaller than a chickenís egg, drastically limiting the amount of food that can be consumed at one time. Surgery produces 25 to 35 percent reductions in weight over the first year and most of this weight loss is maintained five years after surgery. More importantly, the serious medical conditions that accompany extreme obesity improve significantly. Surgery is not without risk and should be performed by skilled surgeons who also provide patients with a comprehensive program for long-term weight control.

Limited gastric capacity and a narrow anastomotic gastrointestinal stoma necessitate certain dietary modifications particularly in the early post-operative period. Diet progression varies amongst health care professionals. A standardized GBP diet does not exist. Generally, most patients begin with a liquid diet due to the small, edematous gastric outlet. This phase of the diet may range from one day up to 6 weeks. Afterwards, pureed textures are introduced and the diet is slowly advanced to soft-textured foods by about 12 weeks. Small, frequent meals rich in protein are emphasized. Liquids are usually consumed between meals to allow greater intake of calories and protein with solid foods. Carbonated drinks may cause distension and discomfort from the carbon dioxide. Red meats, tough meats, breads and milk products may be difficult for some patients to tolerate. Until solid food intake is adequate, high protein liquid supplements such as sugar free Carnation Instant Breakfast (mixed with low lactose milk if necessary) are often recommended.

During the first six to 12 months after surgery, patients generally consume 900 to 1000 calories. Calorie consumption slowly increases due to a change in the pouch size and stoma size, gastric emptying rate and intake of solid food. Sugar and concentrated sweets are discouraged in order to prevent dumping syndrome. Because the pyloric sphincter is bypassed, simple sugar is dumped into the small intestine causing an increase in the osmotic load, thereby drawing fluid into the intestine leading to diarrhea, nausea, diaphoresis and abdominal cramps. The shunting of blood to the intestines and the perceived decrease in blood volume 30 minutes to one hour after a meal prompts many patients to lie down in an effort to improve cardiac output.

Gastric bypass patients generally lose 50%ñ75% of excess body weight and are usually successful with weight maintenance.

The obese population, especially the morbidly obese, is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States. Weight loss programs have been found ineffective in this group. In an effort to improve the quality of life and decrease comorbidities associated with this patient population, gastric bypass surgery may be an option.